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Astroloba herrei

Astroloba herrei


Scientific Name

Astroloba herrei Uitewaal

Synonyms

Astroloba dodsoniana, Haworthia dodsoniana, Haworthia harlandiana

Scientific Classification

Family: Asphodelaceae
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Genus: Astroloba

Description

Astroloba herrei is a compact succulent with stems up to 8 inches (20 cm) high, that are densely covered in pointed succulent leaves. With its grey-green, sharp, keeled leaves and puffed up, inflated flowers, it is easily mistaken for the closely related Astroloba spiralis. However, it is genetically distinct and can always be distinguished by its flowers. Both A. spiralis and A. herrei have puffed up, inflated flowers, but those of A. herrei are smooth unlike A. spiralis, which has a wrinkled, transversely rugose, perianth.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 10a to 11b: from 30 °F (−1.1 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Astroloba plants are increasingly popular as a succulent ornamental, due to the extraordinary beauty of their leaf structure. Some have intricate patterns of lines, margins, spots and raised tubercles on their leaves. Nearly all of them display a crystal-like regularity in their leaf arrangement. This is not always apparent in wild plants, which are usually disfigured by their harsh habitat.

In cultivation, Astrolobas are at their best when provided with some protection from the full sun. In a semi-shade environment, with extremely well-drained soil and gentle conditions, Astrolobas can become remarkably beautiful and ornate.

Unfortunately, when conditions are not ideal, occasional random leaves can die, shrivel up and go brown, all along its stem. This is unfortunate because, as explained, much of the beauty of the plants comes from the intricate, crystalline pattern of their leaves. However, this disfigurement can be avoided by keeping the plants in optimal, fertile conditions – growing steadily and sheltered from stress… – See more at: How to Grow and Care for Astroloba

Origin

Astroloba herrei is native to South Africa (a small area of the Karoo, on the border between the Western and Northern Cape).

Links

  • Back to genus Astroloba
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Astroloba

Astroloba
Astroloba foliolosa in cultivation
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Asphodelaceae
Subfamily: Asphodeloideae
Tribe: Aloeae
Genus: Astroloba
Uitewaal [1]


Distribution [ edit ]

This species has historically been considered rare, disjunct and restricted to small populations near Uniondale in the Little Karoo, and the widely separated Prince Albert in the Great Karoo. In 2017 its distribution was revised when it was found to be widespread in the more remote areas north of the Swartberg mountains. [3] [4]

The species is listed as Vulnerable - partly because it was believed to have a very restricted range, and partly because it is threatened by habitat destruction and illegal collecting. In habitat, it grows on Karoo flats, often underneath bushes which provide it with some protection from the sun. [1] [5]


Astroloba herrei is a compact Astroloba species, with stems growing up to 20 cm high, that are densely covered in pointed succulent leaves. Flowers appear from June to November.

With its sharp, grey-green, keeled leaves, and its puffed up, inflated flowers, the species is easily mistaken for the closely related Astroloba spiralis species. However it is genetically distinct and can always be distinguished by its flowers. Both spiralis and herrei have puffed up, inflated flowers, but those of herrei are smooth (unlike spiralis, which has a wrinkled, transversely rugose, perianth).

Other less reliable ways of identifying herrei are the fine, dark, longitudinal lines (striations) which are sometimes visible below the surface of the leaves, and the slight blueish colour which herrei attains in sheltered or shaded environments. Leaves often feature narrowly acuminate leaf tips that spread outwards more strongly than in spiralis. However these are not certain ways of identifying it the only sure way of distinguishing this species with certainty is by its flowers.

A variety of this plant was formerly recognised as a separate species, Astroloba dodsoniana (Uitewaal). The dark longitudinal stripes of this variety of herrei are faint or even invisible, and the leaves are slightly paler. This is just a growth form and it can appear at random among normal herrei plants in all herrei populations. [2]

This species has historically been considered rare, disjunct and restricted to small populations near Uniondale in the Little Karoo, and the widely separated Prince Albert in the Great Karoo. In 2017 its distribution was revised when it was found to be widespread in the more remote areas north of the Swartberg mountains. [3] [4]

The species is listed as Vulnerable - partly because it was believed to have a very restricted range, and partly because it is threatened by habitat destruction and illegal collecting. In habitat, it grows on Karoo flats, often underneath bushes which provide it with some protection from the sun. [1] [5]


Watch the video: 22 TIPOS DE ASTROLOBA